Basic: 100 Kilos

Basic: 100 Kilos

16 Responses to “Basic: 100 Kilos”

  1. anita says:

    in ufc you don’t have clothing to grab what do you do then?

  2. Hi anita,

    The main thing to concentrate on is on the pressure on the neck making sure that the jaw is facing away from you and he is not able to turn into you. Notice that if we trap his arm (a variation shown at 37 seconds and 1:44 seconds into the video) with our armpit and leg he wont be able to turn away from me. The pressure on the head will kip him from turning into me.

    Eventually the 100 Kilos position is just of many pinning holds one could apply ( North-South, Kasa-Kesa Gatame (Scarfhold), Mount, Reverse Scarfhold, etc..). It is important to be proficient at other holds and on the transitions from one hold to another, so that if the person is very strong we could shift our pressure accordingly. Good question.

    Remember BJJ is the study of the mechanics of the human body and how the body moves weather it is with clothing or without. So almost every concept can be extrapolated to a no-gi situation.

  3. John Smith says:

    Wow that’s realy cool i would like to try that someday

  4. Andre says:

    Could the person on the bottom use the shrimp move in this situation if they were not using a gi.

  5. Yes, but it will be harder because my hand and knee are blocking his hip and my other hand is cross facing his face.. In this situation it is easier to turn to the knees and defend the back with runner’s escape. The first thing the opponent in the bottom has to do is clear his right arm, so that he can begin to turn to his knees. He wants to turn with his back facing me.

  6. Orlando Castillo says:

    I already put this technique on my gameplan. This technique has helped improved my game on how to control my opponents.

  7. greg says:

    excellent, thank you! You just improved my side control 100% I never knew to grab the shoulder material!!!

  8. Yes Greg! That can make a huge difference I am glad you noticed!

  9. greg says:

    Roberto — you are clearly very good and very knowledgeable. I notice its often the ‘little things’ that separates the belts. We all try the same moves BUT we get more successful at them as we progress. At minute 1:47 in the above video you so effortlessly moved your left knee up your ‘opponents’ body, like oil on ice. You don’t even realize maybe, how important these little details are that you now do instinctively, yet they make the biggest difference. I am just a blue belt (1.5 years in) and I am trying to pick on these little details. I have never noticed anyone do that (use the knee to move the opponents arm – i might do it sometimes and not even realize it I wonder). You also used incredible balance putting your center of gravity over his head when going for the armbar. This makes it so difficult to block. Can you make a video about little details like BASE, BALANCE, LEANING, using DISTANCE (or lack there of), using the HEAD, KNEES and HIPS when transitioning from POSITION to SUBMISSION? Thank you so much for taking the time to read this long and note and thinking about these concepts. I suspect you will agree they are so important, yet so difficult to teach….we learn them by putting in the time on the ground.
    Best regards!!!

    Greg J

  10. greg says:

    OK, I found your videos on balance and using the hips under the balance tab

    EXCELLENT

    thank you!!

  11. That is a great idea Greg! I will work on that!

  12. christopher says:

    I want too know wich is the best way to do 100 kilo position. I find myself in side control on my knees . I want to know if holding a guy down on your knees is good or or should i stay of my knees in side control. Can you tell me what are the advantages and dis advantages on your knees or off your knees. Thank you!

  13. Lorraine says:

    Hello Roberto,

    First, I want to say thank you for sharing your skills and talent. In this particular move you state “the first thing the opponent in the bottom has to do is clear his right arm, so that he can begin to turn to his knees. And that he wants to turn with his back facing you.” I’ve been told never to give my back whenever instinctively I feel I can escape in doing so. Why is that this then makes me a little confused between giving it or not giving it?

  14. Lorraine says:

    First, I want to say thank you for sharing your skills and talent. In this particular move you state “the first thing the opponent in the bottom has to do is clear his right arm, so that he can begin to turn to his knees. And that he wants to turn with his back facing you.” I’ve been told never to give my back whenever instinctively I feel I can escape in doing so. Why is that this then makes me a little confused between giving it or not giving it?

  15. @christopher:

    Hi Cristopher, You want to be one centimeter of your knee so all your weight is on the opponent crushing him/her with god pressure instead of on the floor which accomplishes nothing. You also want to make sure your toes are pressing the mat that is behind you so you can add even more pressure.

    Thanks for reading.

  16. @Lorraine:

    Hi Lorraine,

    Giving the back is always an unwanted situation, but waiting in the bottom of side control for the opponent to submit you is more undesirable. If we want to win the match we have to risk a bit to get out sometimes of side control. Also it takes a better opponent to pass your guard and to take your back, than one than can just take your back, so you always want to force situations which would required a more advanced opponent. If done right exposing your back can be done safely Lorraine. Exposing your back has to be done with the right technique or it can end up terribly though.

    Thanks for being such a good reader.

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