Categorized | Gi, Movements, Shrimping, Technique

Basic: The Shrimping or Hip Escape Movement

Basic: The Shrimping or Hip Escape Movement

13 Responses to “Basic: The Shrimping or Hip Escape Movement”

  1. jeff burch says:

    hey roberto,

    I really like the bjj engineer stuff. If I may offer a sugestion, I would like to see the moves from at least two sides so I can see the details of the move. the shrimp class is a good example, I would like to see how you sqeeze your leg under then around the opponent. I really like the circut work outs. Take care.

  2. Emmanuel says:

    Awsome videos, they will really help to improve my game. Is the elbow escape pretty much the same move or is it different technique all together? Is there a way that I can copy these videos to my Computer? It beats taking pages of notes. Thanks

  3. Hi Emmanuel. I believe that there is a program that will allow you to do so. You have to google it. I think Real Player may do the trick but not sure. As far as elbow escape being the same movement you are absolutely right. The question is how technical is the person who is teaching it by that name/

    The first time I heard elbow escape movement for example was from Judo players. They told me back in the day when I was introduced to the sport that to escape kesa-gatame or kasa-gatame (side control) that you must try to connect your elbow and knee (hence the name elbow escape). They also told me that this will work against many holds.

    The “shrimp escape” explaiend above its the elbow escape they referred to with many more details they left out or did not know. They where right about connecting elbow and knee, but there are many other aspect to this basic escape

    Essentially remeber one rule of thumb. Don’t get caught with your back flat on the mat.

  4. Anthony Edenfield says:

    Do you find that larger students have a harder time shrimping, be it they’re over weight or just big guys. Also do you have a half guard sweep posted. Thanks

  5. @Anthony: larger students struggle usually with all mobility drills at first, but they can be taught to them and they can master them. I have over 3, 200lbs+( one of them is 6′ 4″) who can shrimp, granby, shoulder roll and go upside down in a second without a problem. On their weight class this makes them very dangerous.

  6. Josh Gilbert says:

    Roberto these classes are great, but Jeff makes a very valid point about the angles. I wrestled for 7 years up to junior year in high school and I think it would have been very hard to learn if our coaches showed us from only one angle like that. I have a very close friend of mine that also likes to watch these classes with me, he made the same comment about the angles. Now he just graduated from film school and has all the equipment and programs needed to make these classes even better. Now this isn’t something that I do on a regular basis, I promise, but I really think he could help you out and do it for really cheap. I really love your classes keep up the good work. Hopefully we can be a help to you.

  7. jeremy says:

    hi Roberto, i am a new subscriber to you site. i am a judo player (gokyu) from naples florida. i have been taught to escape kesa gatame by bridging straight up and pulling the opponent by the belt directly across my face however i find this difficult against soeone who is even a little heavier than me (i am 5’6 51kg)the shrimping technique is usually the only chance i have for escaping however even that will not work if the opponent has a good hold and tight grip on my gi. i have lost many randori matches in kesa gatame and need help figuring out how to escape against larger, stronger opponents many thanks.

  8. @jeremy:

    Jeremy the escape of which you speak of its a great escape. I love it and it works against huge opponents. Its not about strength its about angle and good bridging.

    Here is a match against a silver medalist at the World Championships of BJJ. His name is Edson Deniz. He lost against BJ Penn and got silver. In my match he gest me in this position at 3:15 in the video:

    http://bjjengineer.com/?p=182

    I tried the escape but he posted with his hands. The main problem is that he got me flat on my back and with my elbow trap. This is a huge mistake, but he beat me to that position ( I was trying to belly down and counter but it didn’t work :( ). Notice right of the bat I tried bridging and the escape and that i didn’t wait. After that he begins to post with his hand. I tried to catch it so that i ccould finish the escape but we fought back and forth him hiding it. Ishould had gone for the back as when he posted the hand now the hold in my hand was weaker, but I have a feeling that it was still way to strong for me to got to his back. After failed attempts he goes for a crappy armbar/americana which I am forced to defend. This attack by him allows me to create more more space and to start escaping the position by starting to turn to my knees which eventually leads to a back defense escape.

    Hope this helps a bit.

  9. Thanks Josh Gilbert. Will work on that

  10. Carlo says:

    How much do classes cost and what will i need for it also how do you get to compete with others.

  11. Lori says:

    Thank you for displaying different examples. How can I accomplish a successful shrimp escape from a heavier person, especially when they are applying pressure?

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. […] Lets first examine basic escapes from the bottom of side. The shrimp and the bridge are one of the first movement one should master in BJJ. Here they re combined to escape from side control. The shrimping motion alone will be difficult to execute when the opponent is applying good pressure from the to. The bridge uses your hips which are a lot stronger than your arms to create the space needed for the shrimping motion( http://bjjengineer.com/?p=49). […]


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